Elements of Art


Line

Diagonal, Horizontal and Vertical Lines
Thick and Thin Lines
Solid or Broken Lines
Parallel Lines
Curved and Angled Lines


Shape

Lines create the outline of shapes. Each time a line outlines a shape, it is really creating two images: the positive one and a negative one.

Geometric Shapes
Organic Shapes
Positive Shapes
Negative Shapes


Colour

Primary Colours: Red, Yellow and Blue
Secondary Colours: Green, Purple and Orange
Tertiary Colours: Purple-Blue, Blue-Green, Yellow-Green ...
Warm Colours: Red, Orange and Yellow
Cool Colours: Blue, Green and Purple
Contrasting Colours: Yellow on Red, Green on Red ...
Complementary Colours: Purple and Yellow, Orange and Blue, Green and Red

Value

Any hue or colour on the colour wheel may have an infinite number of values or tones. When colours are used at full value, they appear strong and bright. When colours are mixed with white paint or water, they appear as muted, lighter tones.

Black
White
Gray
Light
Dark
Tint
Shade


Texture

Rough and Smooth
Made with Repetition
Made with Prints
Made through Rubbings
Made with Dry Brush Techniques
Made with Stippling


Form

When a flat, two-dimensional shape is bent, a third dimension is created. The shape becomes a form. Artists use form when they create sculptures.

3-D Shapes: Cylinders, cones, spheres, cubes, pyramids and prisms ...

Space

Overlap
Placing an object in front of another object makes the object in front appear closer than the one behind.
Changing Size
An object that is smaller looks like it is in the distance while an object that is larger looks like it is closer.
Perspective
Objects can be drawn on a flat surface to give an impression of their relative position and size.